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The Infertility Blog

February 12, 2016
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March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. It’s a great time to bring attention to a condition that’s been far too often overlooked or misdiagnosed. Many women search years to find answers for the pain or infertility they experience with endometriosis.

What is endometriosis? This condition occurs when tissue similar to that lining the uterus (endometrial tissue) is found outside the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, or intestines. Although its cause isn’t clear, some researchers think endometriosis may happen after endometrial tissue from menstrual flow travels backwards through the fallopian tubes and out into the pelvic cavity. As this tissue grows in the pelvis, a variety of biochemical and immune changes occur, but it’s not clear which are the causes and which are the result of the disease.1,2

February 12, 2016
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PFC’s Dr. Philip Chenette joined author Rachel Lehmann-Haupt for a talk on Fertility Preservation at The Battery yesterday evening. Lehmann-Haupt is the author of In Her Own Sweet Time, Egg Freezing and the New Frontiers of Family.

February 11, 2016
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Does infertility treatment affect a child’s neurodevelopment? Past studies have been inconclusive, but results of a recent large study have gone a long way toward putting this longstanding fear to rest.

Led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the New York State Department of Health, and other institutions, the study found that children conceived using infertility treatments—no matter the type—are no more likely to experience a developmental delay by age 3 than children conceived without this treatment.1,2

Types of infertility treatment. Published in January issue of JAMA Pediatrics, the Upstate KIDS Study looked prospectively at children born between 2008 and 2010 in New York state (but not NYC). This included 1,800 children born to women who became pregnant following infertility treatment and 4,000 children born to women who had no treatment.

February 09, 2016
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While pursing my degree in genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I enrolled in a summer course in the animal science department, Lab Techniques in Mammalian Gamete and Embryo Biology.  Although not part of my program requirements, the course description piqued my interest as an exciting complement to the rather tedious work that I was doing in a Drosophila (fruit fly) genetics lab. 

February 05, 2016
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Persistence pays off. That seems to be the message of a study published in The Journal of The American Medical Association (JAMA) at the end of last year. The researchers found that nearly 2 out of 3 women gave birth after undergoing 6 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles.1 These results suggest that stopping after 3 or 4 cycles may be a bit premature—at least for some women.

The study design. The study was a prospective study, which means researchers observed a group of individuals over a period of time to watch outcomes. This study followed nearly 157,000 women from the UK who received more than 257,000 IVF ovarian stimulation cycles between 2003 and 2010, and were followed until the middle of 2012. The researchers defined a cycle as an ovarian stimulation plus subsequent fresh or frozen embryo transfers using eggs produced by that stimulation.

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